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The Definitive Blog for Fine Furniture & Design

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Like father, like son? Yes...and no!

  
  
  
Tom Glasses Low resized 600
What do you get when you take one part Tom Moser, one part David Moser and mix well? A refreshing cocktail of aesthetic sensibilities that brings a new liveliness to the Thos. Moser concept of creating furniture with exemplary quality and exquisite craftsmanship. Essential to the blend are the classically inspired contours of collections like Tom’s Eastward, a refined reinterpretation of an iconic design. Top this off with David’s sensually rich forms, such as in the American Bungalow line, and a cosmopolitan inclination emerges. Wood is the common bond; a singular search for an authentic sensibility is the differentiation.
David Chair Low resized 600
“David and I live in different worlds but there are principles to which we both subscribe,” explains Tom of their commonalities. “Big in my world is functionality and the aesthetics of a thing are important to me: I don’t feel the need for ornamentation for ornamentation’s sake. David has the same values, especially with the economy of material and the economy of form. We don’t subscribe to burdening a piece, to creating something that is laden with superfluous material.” Of their differences, he remarks, “David likes to be present in the product whereas I don’t mind sharing my designs with 6,000 Shakers because I like to feel the trajectory of history.”
 
David’s presence in his work has a deep resonance, but it is one that arcs beyond history: it is a reverberation between art and design. “I approach design as a pragmatic blending of the two disciplines,” he says. “I’m not an artist, I’m a designer. Art serves only itself—take it or leave it—but design has many masters, whether they are economics or the question, ‘Can a thing be built?’ or a need to satisfy the legitimacy of fulfilling human necessity. Though what I design may be artful and sculptural, it’s still grounded in pragmatism so I don’t think of it as art, per se.”
Bungalow Table low resized 600 
David says of his inspiration for the American Bungalow Collection, “For years I have admired the refined aesthetic of Japanese design both in the form of architecture and furniture, principally Tansu, and I've been particularly drawn to the Tori Gate, a symbol of serenity and purity in form. Now add to the Tori Gate the emergence of Bungalow style architecture of the midwest, and bring the architectural elements together with Tansu through Moser’s unique filter: the result is a doctrine of restraint—the resulting fusion the American Bungalow Collection. “
 
Tom’s approach to building furniture is more incremental rather than revolutionary. “I believe the best human efforts are built on the past,” he remarks. “So much credit is given to 20th- and 21st-century accomplishments, such as technology and design, which we assume we have created from scratch. We have had a continuum of pre-learning from history in order to arrive at this place, so I like to call it readiness, as the groundwork has been laid for us.”
Eastward Chair Low resized 600
Tom recalls a trip to the Egyptian Museum in Cairo when he was about thirty years old where he viewed furniture built by the Egyptians that he believes still has relevance today in terms of how it was made. “That trip informed what I have thought about since then when I’m designing,” he explains. “I differ from David in that he starts from pure form when he builds, not from historical context.”
 
Form, grace, historical context and pragmatism: these are the things we consider at Thos. Moser when we’re designing our furniture. We understand the significance of heritage thoroughly given our familial collaborations, and we hope our inspirations will remain iconic treasures for generations to come.